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Trauma Therapy for Couples 

In addition to working individually with clients on trauma, I also provide couple therapy to support trauma recovery for one or both partners. This form of therapy is called Cognitive Behavioral Conjoint Therapy for PTSD (CBCT for PTSD). CBCT is short term and can be completed in about 15 sessions. CBCT is evidence-based and has been shown to reduce both PTSD symptoms and also simultaneously improve relationship quality for the couple. 

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CBCT might feel different than other forms of couple therapy. It is structured, with an agenda each week, coaching on new skills, and homework to complete outside of session. You will learn together how PTSD blocks your recovery from trauma, develop communication and emotional tools to better connect with your partner, and together work on building the kind of life you want to be living - one that is not blocked by PTSD. 

CBCT does involve talking about the impact of trauma on your life and learning to think differently about the trauma. However, it does not involve going over what happened in great detail. You do not need to share vivid details with your partner in order to receive support from them and heal together. If you have been longing for your partner to better understand how trauma impacts you and receive concrete support in your healing journey, CBCT can help. 

 

CBCT may be a good fit if: 

  • You have some relationship concerns you would like to improve, but you and your partner are not in crisis

  • You, your partner, or both of you have experienced a trauma (like sexual assault, sexual abuse, combat trauma, or domestic violence)

  • You, your partner, or both of you have symptoms of PTSD such as:

    • Unwanted memories of the trauma

    • Feeling vigilant or on edge (watchful, like your head is on a swivel)

    • Avoiding certain activities because they remind you of the trauma

    • Feeling guilty or having other strong upsetting emotions when you think about the trauma

    • Getting triggered (upset or jumpy) when you see a reminder of the trauma

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